Episode 2: “The Greatest Love of All”


“The Greatest Love of All” is all about self-love, self-loathing and how the most important relationship of all, is the one you have with yourself. Alesha Dixon is joined by London-based style blogger, mum and body-confidence advocate, Natalie Lee of Style Me Sunday and international supermodel, presenter and race car driver, Jodie Kidd.

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Meet The Guests

Natalie Lee

@stylemesunday 

Mother of two girls and former midwife, Natalie Lee created Style Me Sunday (www.stylemesunday.com) as a space to talk about all things fashion, with feelings thrown into the mix. Natalie’s aim is to inspire women to celebrate their uniqueness, share their struggles and experiences, and to show that there’s no such thing as perfect. As a fierce supporter of other women, Natalie launched the Warrior Woman Project to encourage women to break down their insecurities, be brave and not let anything hold them back from achieving their goals.

Jodie Kidd

@jodiekiddofficial

Jodie Kidd is best known for being a television presenter and one of the most successful models of her generation. Discovered at the age of 15, she has since appeared on the cover of Vogue, opened shows for Givenchy and walked for Alexander McQueen, among other impressive accolades. Kidd is also a sportswoman, enjoying golf and polo, but most notably has enjoyed an impressive career as a professional race car driver for Maserati, competing on some of Europe’s most prestigious race courses. In January of this year, she released her debut book ‘Balance your life’, a motivational 6-week guide to healthy eating and exercise.   

Click to view the transcript

Alesha Dixon:
Hi, I’m Alesha Dixon, and you’re listening to Wear It’s At, a podcast all about midi life milestones, bought to you by online styling service, Stitch Fix. Today, we’ll be chatting about self loving and self loathing in this week’s episode, The Greatest Love of All, and whether your version of self love is blending up a smoothie, finding time to meditate or cozy and down with some chocolate and your favorite film, we’ll be discussing at all.

Alesha Dixon:
Now, this week I’m joined by supermodel, author and adrenaline junkie, Jodie Kidd.

Jodie Kidd:
Hello.

Alesha Dixon:
Lovely to see, JD.

Jodie Kidd:
And you, my love.

Alesha Dixon:
And, also, we have London based style blogger, mum and body confidence advocate, Natalie Lee of Style Me Sunday.

Natalie Lee:
Hello.

Alesha Dixon:
How are you?

Natalie Lee:
Yeah, really good, thank you.

Alesha Dixon:
Thank you both for joining me. Let’s get straight to it. Right, I want to ask you both, what are your views on self love and what does it mean to you?

Natalie Lee:
I think, to me, I like the phrase, “You can’t pour from an empty cup,” right? So, if you look after yourself first, then everyone else benefits from that. So, for example, at the weekend, I got a free weekend. It just happened. My husband was away climbing some mountains. The girls-

Alesha Dixon:
As you do.

Natalie Lee:
Yeah, he just did a challenge, the Three Peaks Challenge.

Jodie Kidd:
Love that.

Alesha Dixon:
[inaudible 00:01:23].

Natalie Lee:
And, yeah, so, and the girls went to the grandparent’s, and I booked myself into a hotel for two nights.

Jodie Kidd:
Oh, wow.

Alesha Dixon:
Lovely.

Natalie Lee:
In London.

Alesha Dixon:
By yourself?

Natalie Lee:
Yeah.

Alesha Dixon:
Yeah.

Natalie Lee:
And just really enjoyed it, and just had the most magical alone time. And that, to me, is like the epitome of self love. And I came back and I was refreshed, and I was, you know, not shouty mom. I was really … It was just lovely.

Alesha Dixon:
You’re always a nicer mum when you’re kinder to yourself.

Natalie Lee:
Absolutely.

Jodie Kidd:
It took me a long time to kind of understand that though. I kind of went through all my twenties and thirties thinking that, you know, you have to keep pushing, you have to do this, you have to be the best, and da, da, da, and, actually, how much of a better person, the better energy, better for all the people around if you do take a little bit of time and, as you said, love yourself. Chill out, read a book, have a lie-in, have breakfast in bed. Just have time for you. Actually, the benefits … It took literally … I can’t believe I’m in my forties now and I’m like, it took me until then to really realize how beneficial it is and good for your head as well.

Alesha Dixon:
I mean, do you believe people that say, you know, “I can’t find five minutes for myself”? I think, surely, you can find five minutes just to be kind to yourself.

Jodie Kidd:
I was that person.

Alesha Dixon:
Really?

Jodie Kidd:
Yeah, and because you just go, “I haven’t got enough time. Why do I need to do that? I’ve got to go and do this and I’ve got to do that.” And, you know, the horse was doing this or the child’s doing, that-

Alesha Dixon:
The horse is doing it.

Jodie Kidd:
It’s always something. So, literally, I was that person, and then, suddenly, my sister, actually, was the one that said, “Look, Jodes, you have to stop. You are just a machine. You have to just love yourself.” And I was going, “Well, I do, I really love myself and I’m absolutely fine. What’s wrong with it?” And she was going, “No, just stop and just, you know, take that time.” Like going to your hotel weekend. And I did it. I remember the first time I did it, where I’d literally no phones, switched off, and I was kind of like going … And I was in a hotel, the same, and I was going, “Gosh, I’m going to get really bored. What am I going to do? Got to do something.” And then, suddenly, after a couple of hours, I went, “Well, I think I’m going to have a hot bath, you know, in the afternoon.”

Alesha Dixon:
It’s the freedom.

Jodie Kidd:
Yeah. I was like, “Oh, my God, I can have a hot bath in the afternoon and have bubbles, and have a glass of wine.” And I suddenly was like, “I get it.”

Alesha Dixon:
It’s switching your mindset as well, isn’t it? Because once a year I go to this retreat in Portugal, and it’s like a wellness retreat, and I don’t know if you’ve heard of Jason Vale, but he’s absolutely amazing. And I used to say, “I’m going to be selfish for the week,” and it was actually my partner that said, “No, you’re going away to have a week of self love.”

Jodie Kidd:
Ah, lovely, yeah.

Alesha Dixon:
And so it’s just like changing … And I thought, “Yeah, he’s right. It’s not about being selfish. I’m going there to be kind to myself, because, actually, it makes me a nicer person.” But I do it once a year and I go for six days, and I don’t like being away from my daughter for six days, but I think, actually she gets a better mum.

Natalie Lee:
Absolutely. And I think as moms we’re often quite sort of martyrish, aren’t we?

Jodie Kidd:
Oh, gosh.

Natalie Lee:
We’re like, “Oh, I can’t find five minutes,” but you have to make the five minutes.

Alesha Dixon:
Yes.

Natalie Lee:
It’s not about … You know, there’s always something to do, isn’t there? But you have to find that time, and we can all find it, every single person. So I think you just have to make it happen.

Jodie Kidd:
It’s so true.

Alesha Dixon:
What do you love most about yourself?

Natalie Lee:
Ooh, good question.

Jodie Kidd:
You first.

Natalie Lee:
I think I love really well. I love hard.

Jodie Kidd:
Oh, that’s nice.

Natalie Lee:
When I love people, I love really, really hard.

Jodie Kidd:
Oh, that’s so nice. Will you love me? I want to be loved hard like that.

Natalie Lee:
You’re in need of love.

Jodie Kidd:
No, no, no. Love the way you said it, it was gorgeous.

Natalie Lee:
And, physically, I like my bum. I’ve got a good bum. Yeah.

Jodie Kidd:
Yeah.

Alesha Dixon:
That’s a good one to like.

Jodie Kidd:
I don’t know. I think what I love about myself is fiercely loyal. So once you’re in that kind of, as, you said, once you’ve got that love, you feel that love. I’ve got that with my friendships. So I’d say my loyalty to my friends and the people that I love, I think is something that I would go above and beyond to kind of withhold. And then, physically, legs. I love my legs.

Alesha Dixon:
I love that we’re talking physically as well.

Jodie Kidd:
Yeah, I’m switching on really quickly. Can we get away from the emotional side?

Alesha Dixon:
I would say for me, I love my compassionate heart. I feel like it’s never ending. And I love natural joyful disposition. I feel like I’m naturally a cup half full, optimistic person. And, actually, when I’m feeling negative or being hard on myself, I feel like I’m moving away from who I am. So I love that I have a sort of natural vibrancy about life. But I would say the thing I like least about myself is I’m short tempered, I’m impatient, and, sometimes, I feel like things I do are never good enough, and I have to always remind myself-

Natalie Lee:
Perfectionist. Are you a perfectionist, or?

Alesha Dixon:
I think the older I’ve got, I’ve realized that I’m never gonna be perfect. But I think I am one of these people that strives for it, but I’m also accepting that I’m perfectly imperfect, and that’s freedom in itself, because before, that wouldn’t have been good enough. It’s like I would’ve had to have, you know, it’s kind of getting to a place where you can just be content with what you have, not necessarily striving for something else. Are you guys into exercise?

Jodie Kidd:
Yes.

Alesha Dixon:
Yes, I thought you would say that.

Jodie Kidd:
But it was also another thing that took me a long time to realize,, because I was always active but never went to the gym, never had a routine. In the last couple of years is the first time where I’ve really been doing, you know, proper exercise, and I have to say my mental balance, everything, I’m just gone, “Can’t believe it’s taken me so long to actually know how beneficial exercise is.” It’s amazing.

Natalie Lee:
So I never really … I just hated the gym, I hated exercising, but in the last couple of years I’ve got into dancing.

Alesha Dixon:
Oh, nice.

Jodie Kidd:
Brilliant.

Natalie Lee:
Yeah, I go dancing. I try and go four times a week, and I am dripping by the end of it. I love it. I’ve ever found anything like it and now I’m addicted.

Jodie Kidd:
And do you think that people will have to find their own way of whatever exercise it is? So-

Alesha Dixon:
Yes, for sure.

Jodie Kidd:
You found yours with dancing. I actually found one on a, I’m not allowed to call it an elliptical machine, apparently that’s really old fashioned.

Natalie Lee:
What is it?

Jodie Kidd:
It’s a cross trainer.

Natalie Lee:
Oh, cross trainer.

Jodie Kidd:
I’m looking, is it cross …

Natalie Lee:
Yes.

Jodie Kidd:
I call elliptical. Everyone’s like, “You can’t call elliptical.” Apparently, that’s so not cool.

Alesha Dixon:
I’ve never heard that. Elliptical.

Jodie Kidd:
It’s elliptical.

Natalie Lee:
I’ve never heard that either.

Alesha Dixon:
I like that.

Jodie Kidd:
My other half just goes, “It’s embarrassing.” So I’ll go to the [inaudible 00:08:19] and I’ll be like, “Have you got an elliptical machine?”

Natalie Lee:
You’re showing your age there, Jodie.

Alesha Dixon:
I can’t get to grips with them.

Jodie Kidd:
So embarrassing. I am turning into my mother. Oh my God. I did this show when I hurt my knee so I can’t do too much running, so I love ellipticals. So I found that, and that really has beneficial things, but running, oh, my God, same thing. Hated it, wanted to cry, wanted to be sick, you know, it was just dreadful.

Alesha Dixon:
What are your thoughts on dieting? I mean, it’s such a broad question.

Jodie Kidd:
I’ve tried it. Obviously been in the fashion world for so many years, you’ve got to be a size eight, or a size zero in America, so you’ve got to be very conscious of what you look like. So, you know, tried diets throughout most of my life and they’ve just been …

Alesha Dixon:
Exhausting?

Jodie Kidd:
Hell, actually, really hell. I mean, some of them, you literally are so calorie low that you can’t even get up and walk without feeling dizzy, you know? It’s kind of like there’s some horrendous ones, and it’s just got to this point in my life where you just do everything in balance.

Natalie Lee:
I don’t deprive myself of anything. I think any time I do deprive myself, I’ve found that I just crave it even more, and then it’s just all goes in. So, if I fancy it, I’ll eat it. And I think it goes back to that self love again, doesn’t it? Once you start looking after yourself and loving yourself, you’re not going to binge on food that makes you feel like crap. So, yeah, I eat food that I like, and I love vegetables and fruit.

Alesha Dixon:
Me too.

Natalie Lee:
And I like, pizzas, and coke and all that kind of stuff, but it’s if I love myself and I’m looking after myself, I do it in moderation, like you said.

Alesha Dixon:
Do you have a go to gym workout outfit? Or are you just a bit like, “Oh, I’ll just throw on anything to go to the gym”?

Jodie Kidd:
Yeah, I’m a bit relaxed.

Alesha Dixon:
I’m a throw on anything to go to the gym girl.

Jodie Kidd:
Yeah, I’m a bit relaxed, but there is some amazing gym kit out there. I’m a member of a gym in London, and I go there, and, God, it’s like a fashion show.

Alesha Dixon:
To go to the gym?

Jodie Kidd:
Yes, they’re looking amazing and make up. I don’t see many of them sweat though, so I don’t know [inaudible 00:10:38]. But they look fab.

Natalie Lee:
I mean I think you’re right. I think putting on whatever’s comfortable is the most important thing with exercise gear. You don’t want to be hoiking it up all the time and readjusting, because that just distracts you from actually doing the exercise. But I have to say, I mean, I am a style blogger, obviously, so my leopard print leggings, I absolutely love them, and that’s probably my favorite workout gear, because they also really feel good. They’re really snug and they fit me really well, and they look bloody excellent.

Jodie Kidd:
Brilliant.

Alesha Dixon:
Gets you in the mood for the dance class.

Natalie Lee:
Exactly.

Alesha Dixon:
I love it. So, of course, this episode is all about self love, and as we know, what you wear can be a big part of this. So what’s your go to wardrobe pick when you want to feel your best?

Natalie Lee:
I mean, for me, I think a power suit is always a good one. I’m wearing one now.

Alesha Dixon:
It’s beautiful.

Natalie Lee:
And it’s nice and bright, and it makes me feel really good. A suit always makes me feel really good, actually. So, yeah, and color. I love color. So I very rarely wear black. I don’t have much black in my wardrobe at all. So, yeah, I just wear things that try and lift me up.

Jodie Kidd:
Yeah. So I’m good old nice pair of jeans and a lovely top, and I just felt comfortable, and you can just tart it up a bit with a nice handbag, or a nice little belt.

Alesha Dixon:
I mean, I’m a bit limited at the moment because I actually haven’t bought any maternity clothes as yet. But I’m a bit like you, Natalie, most of my wardrobe is colorful, and I find that color-

Natalie Lee:
Makes you happy.

Alesha Dixon:
Yeah, it just gives off a mood, doesn’t it? And a bit like you, if I’m going somewhere, whether it’s a meeting or for dinner, and I throw on a nice suit jacket with just a pair of jeans and some heels, that’s enough. You know, the older I get, in a way, the less I try.

Jodie Kidd:
Yes, true.

Alesha Dixon:
You know, which is really freeing and quite nice, you know? I can feel equally as good in just a vest top and some jeans, some nice accessories.

Jodie Kidd:
Yeah. But the power of a lovely boot, or a little bag or something, just that one little thing can change an outfit so much.

Alesha Dixon:
Do you guys have any wardrobe items that you consider real treasures?

Jodie Kidd:
I’ve got an amazing dress that was made for me for the BAFTAs, about, gosh, about 15 years ago, and it’s a couture dress that God knows how much it’s worth, but it’s something that I treasure. I really do treasure it, and it’s incredibly beautifully designed and specially for me, so it’s-

Alesha Dixon:
Have you worn it in the last 15 years?

Jodie Kidd:
No. It’s in the boxes.

Natalie Lee:
So I’m a big believer in not having outfits and just saving them for special occasions, like wearing them. So, you know, I am that mom who will wear sequins on the school run.

Alesha Dixon:
Yes.

Jodie Kidd:
I love it.

Natalie Lee:
So I try and make sure I wear all of my wardrobe if I can, and if I haven’t worn it in over a year, I try and get rid of it.

Alesha Dixon:
Really good way to live, actually.

Natalie Lee:
It’s healthy.

Alesha Dixon:
It’s a good idea.

Natalie Lee:
Yeah. I mean, I don’t have any couture dresses in my wardrobe, so that’s a little bit different.

Alesha Dixon:
I bet you are the coolest mom on the playground.

Jodie Kidd:
Oh, my goodness.

Natalie Lee:
No. You know what-

Alesha Dixon:
I think I’m a disappointment when I show up, because they think, “She’s off the telly, she’s going to look really good,” and I literally turn up in a jumper and some leggings, and they must think, “What a disappointment.”

Natalie Lee:
Well, you know, my daughter said to me the other day, she went, “Mom, why can’t you just wear leggings and a T-shirt like all the other moms?”

Alesha Dixon:
Like me. Bless her. But when she gets older, she’ll realize how dope Mom is.

Jodie Kidd:
Oh, fabulous, yeah.

Alesha Dixon:
I love that.

Jodie Kidd:
Oh, brilliant.

Alesha Dixon:
Do you feel like social media has had a big influence on your appearance? I mean, does it make you feel pressure to look and dress a certain way?

Jodie Kidd:
No, I wouldn’t say I’m really governed by social media. I mean, social media on a whole ginormous other scales of how damaging and how brilliant it is, but I wouldn’t say it really governs what I wear.

Alesha Dixon:
So you wouldn’t find yourself comparing yourself to other people?

Jodie Kidd:
No, but I might say, “Oh, that’s a really nice … You look fabulous. Where’s that jacket from, or something that like that.

Alesha Dixon:
Right.

Jodie Kidd:
But no, it wouldn’t drive me as much as that.

Natalie Lee:
I mean social media is my job, so it definitely does influence what I wear. I take an outfit picture most days, but, for me, it’s really quite positive. I like the fact that it actually kind of makes me make an effort in some ways. So it’s good and it makes me feel good. When I make a little bit of an effort, take a nice picture and post it and get good feedback, hopefully, it does make me feel good. So it does definitely influence me and what I wear.

Alesha Dixon:
Now a lot of people talk about feelings of anxiety stemming from using social media. Natalie, is this something you’ve had much experience with?

Natalie Lee:
I mean, luckily, I’m not one of those women, but I do get a lot of messages with women who message me and say, you know, “I really wish I had your confidence,” and they’re even older than me often. But it is hard, because you do compare yourself to people on social media, because you don’t get the whole story. You think that, you know-

Jodie Kidd:
They’re having the most glamorous, incredible lives.

Natalie Lee:
Yeah. Looking beautiful, and, you know, they’ve got no problems with their husbands, and their kids never answer them back and brush their teeth straight away.

Alesha Dixon:
[inaudible 00:16:33] this perfect picture.

Natalie Lee:
Yeah. So you just don’t get the full story.

Jodie Kidd:
It’s all false.

Natalie Lee:
But, you know, you have to just be very mindful of the fact that everyone is fighting their own battles.

Alesha Dixon:
That’s right.

Natalie Lee:
Everyone has their ups and their downs. So, whenever I get that sort of niggly doubt in my head and feel jealous or feel anxiety, I always just, you know, take a moment to sit back and think, “No, their lives are not what you see on Instagram.” So just be always mindful of that. If you find yourself going into a spiral of anxiety, stop, turn it off, delete the app. It will always be there when you come back, so just-

Jodie Kidd:
And go for a run.

Alesha Dixon:
Really good advice. Yeah, and go for a run. Right, we’re going to take a short break and we’ll be back in just a second, talking about alternative healing, going under the knife, and how to feel comfortable in your own skin.

Alesha Dixon:
Want to know another one of my greatest loves? Fashion. I’m always keen to try out the latest styles and I love to keep my looks fresh, but sometimes it can be hard to know where to start. That’s where Stitch Fix comes in. Tell them what you’re looking for, or why you need a new outfit, and their personal styling teams will curate the perfect looks tailored specifically to you. So, what are you waiting for? Head to stitchfix.co.uk to sign up and celebrate feeling like your best self now.

Alesha Dixon:
Welcome back to Wear It’s At with me, Alesha Dixon. I’m here with Jodie Kidd and Natalie Lee, and we’re talking self loving and loathing. So, ladies, do you feel comfortable in the skin you’re in?

Natalie Lee:
I mean, I definitely do now. It’s taken me a long time. I do think as you get older, you get more relaxed. You don’t necessarily have to try as … Or you don’t feel like you have to try as hard anymore. So, yeah, I definitely feel much more comfortable now. And, also, because I’ve got children, I think your priorities kind of just change, and you’re not sort of trying to attract attention all the time. So yeah. Yeah, it’s getting better.

Alesha Dixon:
What about you, Jodie?

Jodie Kidd:
Up and down. I think in my teenage, late teenage, early 20s, I was super happy, because you’re just kind of like … I was just, you know, where I was in my career and the modeling world, so I was having the best time of my life. And then when you kind of get into your 30s and you start having a big meal, and then the next morning you don’t wake up with a completely flat tummy. Everything starts changing, then you get into motherhood, then the kind of you’ve spiraled down a bit, and then now, I would have to say, as being 40s, now it’s coming back again.

Alesha Dixon:
It’s so interesting how people fear getting older. And I turned 40 last October, but I can honestly say I much prefer my body now to when I was in my 20s. In fact, after I had my first daughter, I actually, I went through a bit of a phase. I was like, “Where have the boobs gone?” And, you know, everything had changed. But then I came out the other side and I was like, oh, the respect I had for my body and I just felt better. I felt more womanly. And, also, I think it went hand in hand with my mental wellbeing. Just the more relaxed I became in myself, the more accepting of my body, and I think that’s the great thing about getting older, you just care less.

Jodie Kidd:
Yes, true.

Alesha Dixon:
And I can honestly say, at this point in my life, I’m the most comfortable I’ve ever been.

Natalie Lee:
I have to say after I had my first child, it was probably my lowest point in terms of whole body confidence.

Jodie Kidd:
How old were you?

Natalie Lee:
I was 29 when I had my first daughter, but I got really bad stretch marks in the last week. I went overdue one week, got really, really, you know, distinctive stretch marks.

Alesha Dixon:
I’ve still got them.

Jodie Kidd:
Yeah.

Natalie Lee:
Yeah, me too. And, you know, that wrinkly tummy and you know? I’ve learned to accept them now, but afterwards, because you don’t really see images of women who have had babies in the media, so I didn’t really know what to expect. I didn’t expect that my body would change so much after having children, and it was a real massive shock to me.

Alesha Dixon:
And you’ve got to give your body the time to find its way back to itself. I mean, it took me probably a good year. I mean, I breastfed for a year, and then it took me, probably, another year after that for my boobs to actually have any kind of curve on them, you know? I was like, they just disappeared. And it was weird, but I just love how the incredible the body is that it can repair and heal itself so beautifully.

Natalie Lee:
I mean, my boy will never ever be the same as it was pre-kids, but I’m okay with that, because, actually, just because I have got stretch marks and a wrinkly, wobbly stomach, that doesn’t mean that it’s not beautiful.

Alesha Dixon:
Exactly.

Natalie Lee:
You know, and it’s taken me a long time to come to that conclusion, and that’s just because that’s not what we’re typically told by society is the epitome of beauty, and you have to rework your brain and the narrative, and change what your-

Alesha Dixon:
Perception is of it.

Natalie Lee:
Yeah.

Alesha Dixon:
Absolutely. Do you ever have wardrobe meltdowns with these things of the past?

Jodie Kidd:
God.

Alesha Dixon:
Yeah.

Jodie Kidd:
[inaudible 00:22:02] no. Jeans, jeans and shirts, you don’t look too bad.

Natalie Lee:
Often when I’m going out, I’m like, “I don’t have anything to wear.” And, literally, you know, I’ve got a lot to wear. My husband’s like, “Have you looked in your wardrobe recently?”

Alesha Dixon:
Why is it every woman says, “I’ve got nothing to wear,” and every man says, “Have you looked in your wardrobe? You’ve got loads of stuff? Because my other half does exactly the same.

Natalie Lee:
I think it’s just that, you know, you have this idea, don’t you, and it’s like, I want to feel like this and I don’t have anything that just nails it. The other day I went to this hip hop brunch thing, and I’m like, my wardrobe is so un-hip hop, it’s ridiculous. So I just didn’t have anything to wear and it was like, you absolutely do just just throw on like a baseball top and some jeans and you’ll be fine.

Alesha Dixon:
I have the meltdowns when I’m not organized. Like, if I’ve got a performance or something and I leave it to the last minute, I end up trying on a million and one things, I have a pile of clothes on the floor, and then I’m overwhelmed. And it’s always my other half that comes in and he’s like, “Why don’t you try… And then I get stressed with him, but then he always ends up helping me, and he’s like, every time he says, “You need to do this the day before, two days before, so that come the day that you have to leave the house, you don’t have a meltdown.”

Natalie Lee:
What happens with me is you always end up going back to the first outfit that you took out.

Alesha Dixon:
I know. But I think also a good rule is don’t try on clothes when you’re not in a good mood.

Jodie Kidd:
Yes.

Alesha Dixon:
Because it just never works.

Jodie Kidd:
Good idea.

Alesha Dixon:
Because it’s what’s going on in your head again, rather than the reality of probably what you’re trying on, you know? But hey ho, we all have them. Right, getting older. Oh, the people love to talk about this. What are your feelings on getting older?

Natalie Lee:
I mean, I think getting older is a real privilege. I love the fact that I’m getting older.

Alesha Dixon:
But whenever I speak to women that are getting older, they all seem okay with it. It just seems to be the media that has an issue with it.

Jodie Kidd:
I think they’re changing though. You see a lot of advertising campaigns using older women now and, you know, things like that. So I think it is changing.

Natalie Lee:
And, you know, I think there’s a bit more of a trend now to stop Photoshopping out things like wrinkles and stretchmarks, and we want to see it, because we have it. We want to be represented in the media, so let’s see it and let’s stop erasing all the good bits.

Jodie Kidd:
Here, here.

Alesha Dixon:
Absolutely. So, obviously, we’re saying the older we get, our bodies, of course, change, and we should embrace it.

Jodie Kidd:
Yeah. Yeah. Hence why I’m keeping all my clothes because I have no idea when I’m going to go back to the size eight, or a 10, or a 12, or 14, because we change constantly. So that’s my excuse anyway.

Alesha Dixon:
What are your thoughts on plastic surgery? Are you kind of each to their own or au natural is best?

Natalie Lee:
I mean, I’ve got friends who have had plastic surgery, and I think, you know, if that makes you feel good and get on and do it. It’s not for me. I don’t think I would have plastic surgery, because I’m quite comfortable in how I look and my skin, and I also don’t always think it necessarily looks very good. I am not a fan of, you know, fillers, lip fillers and Botox. I don’t think it makes them look any better.

Jodie Kidd:
You can really tell with people nowadays, like this puffiness around the cheekbones, and your like … And they go, “No, that’s the filler look.”

Alesha Dixon:
I think the thing I find the most interesting is that you would presume that it’s women in their late 30s, late 40s that are having everything done, and these days, it’s the younger girls that are getting it done. I mean, I’m 40, and I can happily say I’ve never had Botox, never had anything, but I’m looking at girls in their early twenties that are getting lip fillers and Botox, and I’m thinking what is going on?

Natalie Lee:
I don’t think it’s about the aging, I think it’s-

Jodie Kidd:
It’s a look.

Natalie Lee:
… more of a look.

Alesha Dixon:
It’s ridiculous.

Natalie Lee:
Yeah. But your skin is amazingly, Alesha. Like-

Alesha Dixon:
Back at you.

Natalie Lee:
… ridiculous. It is. I bet people assume that you have had-

Alesha Dixon:
Of course. I mean, I read an article last week, a lady who was in the sort of beauty industry had listed all the things that she thinks I’ve had done, and I couldn’t even be bothered to respond.

Jodie Kidd:
Oh, no, don’t.

Alesha Dixon:
I couldn’t even be bothered. I thought, “Do you know what? If that’s what you think, you just crack on with your thoughts. I know that I’ve not had anything done and that’s all that matters, you know? But it’s interesting that people would presume it, but I think it’s like you said, there’s a look that the young girls get. I don’t think I have that look. I would have that trouty pouty look, but I don’t have it.

Jodie Kidd:
But there’s also, you know, from going back to, not that we’ve even been there, but Kim Kardashian, these ginormous bum inserts that everyone seems to be going, and it’s like, wow, you know? And young girls are all having those now.

Alesha Dixon:
Yeah. And maybe it is a mindset again, because I’ve always wanted a bigger bum, but I’ve just accepted that I don’t have a big bum, you know? Most I can do is some squats.

Jodie Kidd:
But that is an extraordinary, large bottom.

Alesha Dixon:
Maybe when you get older, again,, you care less because maybe if I was 21, I don’t know. Maybe I’d [crosstalk 00:27:15].

Natalie Lee:
Do you think it’s comfortable, sitting on those … I’ve always been quite fascinated. Also, you know, we’re governed by trends. So just because big bums are in now-

Jodie Kidd:
Yeah, exactly.

Natalie Lee:
If you have plastic surgery to make your bum bigger and then, you know, five minutes later it’s not in anymore, what are you going to do?

Alesha Dixon:
Yeah, but, see, the thing is, men are always gonna love big bums, and I think a lot of women that get things done, it’s to appease the opposite sex.

Jodie Kidd:
With plastic surgery, with me, I think if it makes anyone feel happier, it’s … You know, I’ve had friends that have had many kids and, you know, they’ve had their boobs done a bit, and it makes them feel so much more womanly, and positive, and that’s great for them, but it’s a very individual thing.

Alesha Dixon:
It is. And each case is different. And I completely agree with you. You know, if it’s something that’s bringing somebody down or they’re not living a great quality of life because something’s making them unhappy, they should change it. I’m just not for young girls doing it unnecessarily when there’s nothing wrong with them and they’re perfectly okay. And I hope that I can raise my daughter to be comfortable in her skin and accept who she is, and not feel the pressure to have to try and look like everybody else, because, essentially, that’s what they’re all doing.

Alesha Dixon:
If you could change one body part about yourself, what would it be? Jodie’s having a look at herself. Hmm, what could I change?

Jodie Kidd:
I think it’s always going to be stomachy, kind of love handley areas, isn’t it? Do you think?

Natalie Lee:
Not for me.

Alesha Dixon:
Yeah, but you need something to grab hold of.

Natalie Lee:
Yeah, no, that’s true, that’s true. I think my feet has always been a thing.

Alesha Dixon:
Same.

Natalie Lee:
Really big feet.

Jodie Kidd:
I can’t believe it.

Natalie Lee:
I’ve got big feet. I was always told I had big feet as a kid.

Alesha Dixon:
How funny.

Natalie Lee:
I’ve got long toes, and they don’t look good in little sandals, pretty little sandals. So, yeah, it would be my feet, but I don’t think there’s any plastic surgery that can help that.

Alesha Dixon:
So funny. I’m with you. I’m, yeah.

Jodie Kidd:
Your feet as well.

Natalie Lee:
What do you hate about your feet, Alesha?

Alesha Dixon:
They’re just not … I just wasn’t blessed with-

Natalie Lee:
With good feet.

Alesha Dixon:
… pretty feet. I used to hide my feet from boyfriends.

Jodie Kidd:
Yeah, [inaudible 00:29:34]. Why is she wearing socks in the Caribbean?

Alesha Dixon:
My partner that I’m with now is the first person that I’ve been with that’s seen my feet.

Jodie Kidd:
Really?

Natalie Lee:
Really? Wow.

Jodie Kidd:
[crosstalk 00:29:39].

Alesha Dixon:
Yeah. Yeah.

Natalie Lee:
Oh, wow. So you have a major-

Alesha Dixon:
I did. But not anymore. Not Anymore.

Jodie Kidd:
Socks in the bath.

Alesha Dixon:
Like, I used to … I would never wear open toe shoes or anything, but now I’m like, I do, and I embrace it and it’s fine. Yeah. And, actually, I love them. They’ve helped me a lot. They’ve got me up a mountain, they helped me win Strictly Come Dancing.

Jodie Kidd:
Exactly.

Alesha Dixon:
My feet have been good to me.

Jodie Kidd:
They’ve had some abuse though.

Alesha Dixon:
I’ve had to learn to like them. It’s just taken 40 years.

Jodie Kidd:
Brilliant.

Alesha Dixon:
Okay, moving on. So we’ve all got children.

Jodie Kidd:
Yeah.

Alesha Dixon:
Did pregnancy change the way you feel about yourself?

Natalie Lee:
I felt lovely being pregnant.

Jodie Kidd:
Me too.

Natalie Lee:
I felt so womanly, and beautiful, and sexy, and it was the first time that I actually, you know, got my body out and wasn’t worried about, how my stomach looked or … It was so freeing-

Alesha Dixon:
Not having to suck in.

Natalie Lee:
Exactly, it’s so true. It was the most special time. And when you’re pregnant, it … I mean, I used to be a midwife as well.

Alesha Dixon:
Oh, wow.

Jodie Kidd:
Oh, amazing.

Natalie Lee:
Yeah, so the beauty of seeing a woman pregnant and then a baby in her arms was the most magical thing that I’ve ever seen in my whole life.

Alesha Dixon:
And I bet it never got old. I bet it was always special.

Natalie Lee:
Never.

Alesha Dixon:
Because it would all be different, wouldn’t it, every time.

Natalie Lee:
And it felt like such a privilege to be allowed to witness that and experience that with somebody.

Alesha Dixon:
Did you feel great being pregnant?

Jodie Kidd:
Yes. I think because it was the first time in the world that I hadn’t, you know, had a glass of wine for nine months, actually, a bit longer, so my body was going, “Thank you.” And energy, oh, it was just … It was like I wasn’t really pregnant because I had so much energy.

Alesha Dixon:
Right, ladies, finally, to practice some self love right here and now, tell me three things about yourself that you love.

Natalie Lee:
Okay. Shall I go first?

Jodie Kidd:
Yeah, go on.

Alesha Dixon:
Yes.

Natalie Lee:
Okay. I think the first thing has got to be my bum, shaking my bum. I like shaking my bum. Oh, God, I was going to say boobs next, but it’s like [crosstalk 00:31:53].

Alesha Dixon:
Go on girl.

Natalie Lee:
Boobs, butt and lips.

Alesha Dixon:
It’s refreshing.

Natalie Lee:
Yes. And eyes. I’ve got dark skin and green eyes.

Jodie Kidd:
You have beautiful eyes.

Natalie Lee:
So people always comment on them, so I think I’m going to have to say those.

Jodie Kidd:
Yeah.

Alesha Dixon:
Okay.

Jodie Kidd:
Okay. Physical, height. I love my height, and being six foot two, normally, most people kind of go, “Oh, God, that’s too tall,” or “You can’t wear high heels.” No, I bring out the biggest blinking high heels that make me six foot seven and people are just like, “Whoa.”

Natalie Lee:
I love that.

Jodie Kidd:
Yeah, so height, I really love. I love my family. And then what would be the next one that I really love? I think it would be maybe how I look at life. I live kind of everyday as if it’s the last, and if … This is why I was saying earlier though, I find it hard to say no because I love opportunities. I love meeting people. I love talking and experiencing, and so that kind of probably is the reason what is added up to a few negatives in my life, because I just don’t have any time, because I’m always saying yes, because I love life.

Alesha Dixon:
Ah, that’s nice.

Natalie Lee:
Yeah, that’s really nice.

Alesha Dixon:
That’s really Nice. How do I follow that?

Jodie Kidd:
What about you, Alesha?

Alesha Dixon:
I don’t know. Three things I love about myself? I love my energy. I think that zest for life as well, you know, just I try every day to be as present as possible, and as grateful for everything, and living in the now, and, yeah, it’s a really hard question to answer.

Jodie Kidd:
It really is. And you two have shown me up now. “I like my boobs, and my butt, and my lips.” Yeah, beat that.

Alesha Dixon:
I love that though. I love it. Well, thank you ladies. Right, on that positive note, I think it’s a great place to leave it for the week. Thank you so much, Jodie and Natalie for joining me and for being so open about your relationships with yourselves.

Jodie Kidd:
Thank you.

Natalie Lee:
Thank you. That was fun, thank you.

Alesha Dixon:
Thanks for listening. We’ll be back with our next episode, Am I Adulting? where I’ll be discussing growing up without growing boring with the inspirational Katie Piper and multi talented Faye Tozer. Until then, hit subscribe so you don’t miss out.

Alesha Dixon:
What’s the one go to outfit that never fails to make you feel your absolute best? Well, we want to know. Mine has got to be a classic blazer, white vest and jeans, because it always makes me feel confident, sophisticated and ready to conquer anything. If you’re keen to find an outfit that makes you feel amazing, head on over to stitchfix.co.uk and book a personalized fix, tailor made for you by one of the expert stylists.

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